print

November 2016 Newsletter

I’m a week late with this follow-up. (Sorry.) Two weeks ago, I posted about an employee (fictionally named “Zoey”) who had a peanut allergy. After she asked a peanut-butter-loving co-worker (“Addison”) to be considerate, Zoey found a big glob of peanut butter smeared under her desk, which caused her to get sick. Addison denied being responsible. To recap from last time: *I said I would fire Addison if I determined that she...
Your employees, similar to the rest of the world, likely are riveted by one of the most hotly contested and controversial elections in U.S. history: the 2016 presidential campaign. Regardless of whether your employees are with Her, feeling the Bern or sharing Trump-isms, they almost certainly are talking about the campaign and also may be talking about their political beliefs and activities while at work. This can lead to a myriad of...
On October 17, 2016 the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) approved a Strategic Enforcement Plan (SEP) for Fiscal Years 2017 – 2021. This recently approved SEP updates the EEOC’s first SEP which spanned Fiscal Years 2013 – 2016. A complete version of the 2017 – 2021 SEP is available on the EEOC’s website. In the updated SEP, the EEOC has identified six substantive area priorities—many of which reaffirm but more narrowly tailor...
The Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) again delayed enforcement of the anti-retaliation provisions included in the revised recordkeeping regulation, 29 CFR Part 1904, until December 1, 2016. OSHA delayed enforcement at the request of Northern District of Texas Judge Sam Lindsay. Judge Lindsay is considering the complaint and motion for preliminary injunction filed by several industry groups challenging the anti-retaliation...
Or is it loved as much as ever, as long as it doesn’t cost employees money? Interesting questions are raised by a study conducted and recently published by Alexandre Mas, a Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at at Princeton University, and Amanda Pallais, a Paul Sack Associate Professor of Political Economy and Social Studies at Harvard University. The professors conducted a study based on an actual recruitment for call center...
Last week, two lawsuits were filed in federal court in Texas seeking to block the Final Rule on white-collar exemptions to the overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, which was issued in May. Meanwhile, legislation that would delay the effective date of the rule until June 2017 just passed the U.S. House of Representatives, and there is other legislation pending in Congress that would “nullify the rule.” The overtime...
Back to Top