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IAML Insights

May 11, 2017

On May 3, 2017, the final curtain was rung down on the Volks saga: OSHA revoked its so-called “Volks Rule,” which would have amended the recordkeeping regulations in 29 C.F.R. Part 1904 to, it hoped, avoid the holding of the District of Columbia Circuit in AKM LLC dba Volks Constructors v. Sec’y of Labor, 675 F....

May 10, 2017

A few months ago, a three-member Third Circuit appellate panel in Acclaim Systems, Inc. v. Infosys, upheld a district court decision, which dismissed tortious interference claims against an employer for engaging with four individuals subject to non-compete agreements, because the employer had no knowledge of the non-competes at issue when it...

May 09, 2017

In NLRB v. J. Weingarten, Inc., the U.S. Supreme Court held that employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement may request the presence of a union representative during an investigatory interview that the employee reasonably believes may result in disciplinary action. In the 42 years hence, the Board has vacillated on the issue of...

May 09, 2017

On May 4, 2017, the New York Court of Appeals answered who may be liable under the state’s fair employment law for discrimination based on an individual’s conviction record.  The opinion in Griffin v. Sirva, Inc. is noteworthy because it is increasingly common for more than one company to play a role in criminal background checks (e.g., some...

May 08, 2017

An article in Monday’s New York Post discussed misunderstandings that can arise in the workplace based on use of “chat” apps and their associated emoji. A woman interviewed for the article said that she had messaged her co-workers that she would be late for a meeting, and her boss replied with emoji of a “poop” (am I allowed to use that word on...

May 05, 2017

On May 2, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 1180, the Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017. Commonly referred to as the “comp time” bill, H.R. 1180 would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow employees to choose paid time off or “comp time” instead of cash wages as compensation for working overtime hours. ...
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